#NOMAKEUP

Soulful, raspy, sensual, humble, curvaceous, stylish, humanitarian, mogul, actress, pianist, director, singer, and mother, are just some of the words used to describe the one and only, Alicia Keys.

She stole our hearts at the peak of the 2000’s with Fallin’ and kept leading us on with songs like Diary, You Don’t Know My Name, No One, and Girl on Fire. She’s taken a break, started a family, begun directing plays, began fighting for human rights, and somehow in between it all she still managed to make music. It seems that she has a new sound and a new outlook on life based on one of her newest singles, “In Common”. It’s a fresh take on a new love. The song talks about the joys, surprise and worry that someone could possibly love her and accept her for who she is.

One of her newest mantras is the no makeup movement. In the world of today, with no shortage of hip, butt, and lip injections, breast augmentations, skin bleaching, weaves, and makeup it’s no surprise that our girls are beginning to look like full blown women at such a young age. Makeup and the other assets is something women indulge in for various reasons, whether it be simple self-expression or possibly concealing a flaw they may not like, but as a young child turning on the television or even going to the store, seeing everyone dolled up, with extreme curves…I can only imagine going through puberty during this epidemic. Now more than ever, seeing these things could lead the youth to develop low self-esteem, absence of confidence among other things with no one to look up to. Thanks to Alicia Keys and many other women in the industry, we can finally find some inspiration for our girls instead of weeding out all the celebrities.

Alicia Keys published a piece in Lena Dunham’s Lenny Letter and made several statements that really made me stop and think.

“Does it start somewhere in second grade after picture day when you wear your frizzy hair out ’cause your mama says it’s beautiful but all your “friends” laugh at you?”

Deny as we may, we’ve all had this feeling. Our outfit wasn’t the best, our shoes weren’t the newest, we might’ve been “late bloomers”, we may have had to wear braces, might’ve had acne, our voice may have been a bit funny sounding, our hair wasn’t the longest or straightest, and our skin wasn’t the smoothest or lightest-as society has taught us, or it might’ve just been a bad day and we forgot to care about how we look for others sake.

“You grab the brush and gel and pull your beautiful big hair back into the tightest ponytail you possibly can to contain your unique hair in a bun — hiding a piece of who you are in order to fit into a picture of what others seem to see as perfection.”

I can remember in elementary school seeing movies like Clueless or Bring it On, and even seeing celebrities like Aaliyah and Beyoncé and looking up to them, in a sense kind of wanting to be them, because they’re so beautiful and must live an awesome life. I can remember in high school, if you didn’t have the new Jordan’s, a pair of True Religions, a designer purse, the most “laid” sew in…. well, you know the rest. At such a young age it’s instilled in us, somehow, that we need to look like this, have this, do this, talk like this, walk like this, etc.

“Before I started my new album, I wrote a list of all the things that I was sick of. And one was how much women are brainwashed into feeling like we have to be skinny, or sexy, or desirable, or perfect. One of the many things I was tired of was the constant judgment of women. The constant stereotyping through every medium that makes us feel like being a normal size is not normal, and heaven forbid if you’re plus-size. Or the constant message that being sexy means being naked.”

I wish I could’ve included the entire article because it was so raw and real. The stigma that Alicia Keys along with many everyday women experience is real! There are many who like putting on a “face” simply because they like it and there are also those who really struggle with their inner happiness and acceptance. They’re not curvy enough so they have to get injections, their butts are a little flatter than some so why not pump it up, lips aren’t as full as her’s: Botox! The list goes on and on. One problem I’ve identified is that we can find 1,000 flaws, but can’t seem to recognize 10 beauties. Alicia Keys wrote a song, “When a Girl Can’t Be Herself”. The lyrics are inspiring: In the morning from the minute that I wake up , What if I don’t want to put on all that makeup, Who says I must conceal what I’m made of , Maybe all this Maybelline is covering my self-esteem. After receiving so much flack at the recent VMA’s, Alicia Keys tweeted, “Y’all, choosing to be makeup free doesn’t mean I’m anti-makeup. Do you!”.  It seems as though people were confused. Alicia simply means that she no longer wants makeup to be her go-to when it comes to being beautiful. She doesn’t want to feel obligated to plaster it on before she leaves the house. She also doesn’t want to put anyone down if they do choose to indulge in it.

The key is self-worth, confidence, and acceptance. Be unashamed, proud, and unapologetic. If you like it wear it, if you want it get it, but if you’re not happy with yourself then you’ll never be able to accept you for you. TLC may have been the best to say it:

You can buy your hair if it won’t grow

You can fix your nose if he says so

You can buy all the make up

That M.A.C. can make

But if you can’t look inside you

Find out who am I too

Be in the position to make me feel

So damn unpretty

I’ll make you feel unpretty too

Let’s follow in Alicia Keys’ footsteps and set an example for others, including our youth.  Here’s a link to the full article. http://www.lennyletter.com/style/a410/alicia-keys-time-to-uncover/

 

#BlackGirlMagic

#WomenofColorWednesday

 

Social Media Leading Women To Objectifying Their Body’s

 

women2

By Bre Nicole J

insidethegirlsroom.com

Social media is a relatively new paradigm , not even two decades old. Various social media outlets include twitter, instagram, tumblr, facebook, dating sites, kik, and many more. So what do all of these outlets have in common? Researchers are continuously studying how women evaluate their body images through social media.

Since the start of Myspace and Facebook , researchers wanted to know how much time do people actually spend on these sites. Now, studies are leaning more towards how women compare their bodies to other women because of the excessive picture posting.

In the Sage Journal, “Psychology of Women Quarterly”, Psychologists Jasmine Fardouly, along with her team wrote,

“Given the large number of images posted to Facebook (currently over 250 billion images; Facebook, 2013), as well as the appearance-related comments they often receive from others, Facebook may well be considered an appearance-focused media type.
women1Alone women spend an average of 2 hours a day on Facebook. So it’s no surprise that in between those hours of the day, women are loading pictures and often times scrolling through their timelines lurking on images of other women or their own photos.

Researchers Slater and Tiggemann (2015) found that the amount of time spent on social networks was associated with greater self-objectification.

Women have a long history of being objectified in the media from television, music videos, and print magazines, why would the objectification just stop at these mediums and not social media? And why are women self objectifying themselves?

Some can argue low self-esteem, vanity, or insecurities. Women have been known to compare themselves to other women, whether short, skinny, tall, plus size, short hair or long hair. It’s just something women do—that is—label themselves in comparison to others.

When a person compares their own inner or self-image to an image that has been filtered on social media it can pose the threat to self objectification and self-absorption. When self comparisons take place that person looks at themselves as the spectator or observer.

One researcher suggests, “Self-comparisons to images of a previous self might engender a greater focus on specific body parts, also contributing to self-objectification.”

Researchers give tips on how to avoid becoming self objectified and harming one’s self esteem. Here are the tips :

Post fewer images of self on social media

Follow people on Facebook or (social media ) who post photos less frequently

Guess I’ve lost the battle to this fight! Let us know how you feel about this study?

Sources:

Author Rick Nauert PhD, Young Women Compare Themselves on Social Media”

Author Rebecca Adams The Huffington Post “How Facebook Stalking Could Lead Women To Objectify Their Own Bodies”

Fardouly, J., Diedrichs, P.C., Vartanian, L.R., Halliwell, E. (2015). ‘The Mediating Role of Appearance Comparisons in the Relationship Between Media Usage and Self-Objectification in Young Women’, Psychology of Women Quarterly, Sage Journal , p 34 doi: 10.1177/036168431558184

 

Bre Nicole is a multimedia personality working in front and behind the scenes. She founded a blog site called insidethegirlsroom.com, the fall of 2014, while studying Family Life Education and Communications at Western Michigan University. During her senior year at WMU, she received a full ride scholarship at Specs Howard School of Media Arts for Broadcast Media. Bre Nicole has also interned with Oh So Radio as a blogger, hosted on a TV show called 7 Mile 2 Belle Isle Reloaded and was a production intern for the Blaine Fowler Morning Show at 96.3 WDVD (Cumulus Media Detroit). She is currently an on air radio personality for Power96.5 in Lansing,Michigan. Media is just the tip of the ice berg when it comes to Bre Nicole,this young,ambitious 24-year-old has also interned as a suicide prevention specialist and has a nonprofit agency called Saving Our Sisters that focuses on breaking abusive family cycles and prevention of domestic violence and sexual assault in our communities, while providing workshops on emotional well-being and healthy relationships.

Hollywoods Grand Jester, Robin Williams, Is Dead At 63

[Credit: Fan Pop: Dolores Freeman]
[Credit: Fan Pop: Dolores Freeman]
Oscar Winner and Comedian, Robin Williams, died Monday at the age of 63 in his Marin County home. Police say Williams died after committing suicide, which marked the end of his recent battles with server depression.

Wiliiams was found unconscious and not breathing in his Tiburon, California home north of San Fransico. The Marin County Sheriff’s Department pronounced he was dead at 12:02 p.m. after receiving a 911 call.

Authorities suspect his death was due to suffocation. His spokeswoman stated, he had recently been struggling with depression.

“This morning, I lost my husband and my best friend while the world lost one of its most beloved artists and beautiful human beings,” his wife said in a statement Monday.

Investigators are still investigating his death and toxicology test are forthcoming. Just last month, Williams openly spoke about enrolling into a 12-step treatment at a Minnesota facility.

Many family, friends, and fans still mourn the loss of the “funny man with the plan” Robin Wiliiams.