Women of Color Wednesday: Domonique Freeman

Domonique Tiera Freeman…there’s so much I could say about this girl. I met Domo in high school, and I’ve always noticed this glamour and confidence about her that I strived to attain for myself. She is the ultimate go-getter. Plus, she’s a highly educated health advocate, which I think is strikingly impressive.fullsizerender

Freeman was born in Franklin, Tennessee and raised in Saginaw, Michigan. She currently holds a Bachelor’s of Science in Health Science from Saginaw Valley State University, and is currently working on her Master’s in Public Health at Georgia State University. Freeman is a health advocate, a contracted health educator, and administrative assistant to the Director of Nursing at East Lake Arbor Nursing Home.

When asked what her life mission is, Freeman stated that it was to, “help individuals realize and live up to their full life potential. This includes improving their well-being and livelihood, helping them to see the importance of seeking and working to be in harmony with themselves, nature and others around them. I frequently talk about nutrition because it impacts all of this.”

Loving the positive vibes from this message. I think that it’s important for black women and all women of color in general to help bring out the potential in others, and help each other live fulfilling lives.

She continued, “I want people to know that in taking these fake, chemical and hormone-filled foods keep your vibrations down and alter your wellbeing. On a more professional note, I plan to help low income populations have access to healthier, safer foods and equal health care by changing and writing policies at the local, state and federal level.”

Not only does Freeman promote healthier lifestyle choices, but she also motivates others to use those choices as a guide for better self-care. She encourages other women of color to, “Love yourself. Get to know yourself, who you truly are. You are more than just a being in a body but you are a spirit with a soul that is here for a purpose. Ingest high nutrient img_0749foods that feed your soul and block anything that doesn’t come from the earth, that only helps to alter your state of wellbeing. You lose nothing valuable in letting go of what does not serve you. Living a healthy lifestyle isn’t always easy and it’s even harder to get started after generations of wrong teachings but it starts by incorporating good habits into your life, adding high nutrient foods to your diet, and drinking lots of water!”

This is so, so important. We live in an age where food and cooking has become a chore and something that’s supposed to quick, fast, and cheap. We no longer care about where our food comes from, or what we put into our bodies. We’d rather get the $5 fill-up at KFC instead of preparing natural, hearty foods that are good for your body and overall wellbeing. You really are what you eat…which is why America is so obese. But that’s a whole other conversation. Fundamentally, I think these types of conversations need to be had more often, especially in black neighborhoods. It’s time that we start taking care of our bodies, and Freeman embodies that statement to the fullest. Take notes.

Additionally, Freeman encourages women of color to, “Teach your children the importance of a happy lifestyle. If you truly love your babies, you will work to break the attachments to toxic foods and beings. Learn to unlearn the wrong that has been passed from generation to generation, acknowledge ways that we cause our own sickness, and make changes in order to heal not only yourself but the generations of black beings to come.”

Freeman’s biggest accomplishments are being a CDC Undergraduate Public Health Scholar, which gave her the chance to intern with minority children in the Detroit area, teaching them healthy habits that they will be able to pass on to their peers. Freeman has also taught workshops to adults and children in the Saginaw area on different health topics such as the dangers of sugar and the obesity epidemic in the United States.

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How amazing is that?! It’s ALL about the youth. Freeman passing on her message to children at such a young age is how you begin to change the current situation. Teach them young so that they can be the change for the next generation. Bravo.

Freeman says that she started out as an insecure, quiet, shy, awkward black girl. However, she explained that, “Through this journey to living a healthy life, I have learned who I am, what I have to offer the world, and gained a sense of security within myself and love and value for myself that I want all black women to have regardless of whatever they’ve been through in the past, whatever flaws they may have.”

I can relate to this. I still think I’m shy and quiet, and I am definitely awkward (lol); however, I, too, have learned who I am, what I want in life, and I am a 100% unapologetically carefree black woman and proud of it. Finding your true sense of self is when you can fully be confident throughout your life journey.

The soon to be Yogi and Holistic Wellness Practitioner is also a transitioning vegan, and helps people who are interested in transitioning to make that switch.img_1021

Freeman has a website coming soon that will consist of weekly health-related blogs, recipes, videos, and more. It will also be a way to book her for workshops, one-on-one training, and grocery store tours. So be on the lookout for DomoniqueTiera.com. You can follow her on Instagram and Twitter @Domoookunn, and check her out on Facebook.

You’re an intelligent black queen, Domo! You encourage me to make healthier lifestyle choices, and you inspire me to be a part of this growing movement of self-care and self-love! Your unique talents, positive energy, and deep understanding of current issues that matter most to you will get you so far! Continue to do great things, pursue your dreams, and excel in your passions. Lastly, thank you for being an inspiration to me and other women of color!

Learn From the Pros

Everyday we wake up with the intention to do great things. Wether that be, being great at our new job, helping an old lady cross a busy street or just being a great friend, we all start with great intentions. Throughout the day, we experience situations that make our reactions not so great. Like this morning when that guy cut you off while merging on the highway. Yeah, I probably would have yelled and cursed him out too. But regardless, we allow temporary situations to distract us from our greatness. 

Take this  moment to learn from the pros. There are people in this world that wake up and plan to do terrible things, however we can’t be afraid to live amongst these frigid people. We must find a sense of peace in this world. It’s important to allow yourself to live and be happy no matter what evil the world may bring. 

“Be not afraid of greatness. Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and others have greatness thrust upon them.” William Shakespere

This great poet and play writer, has a valid point. See, we can’t allow ourselves to be fearful of our greatness. It is the one thing that will get us to where we want to be in life. Our greatness allows us to see our flaws as opportunities of improvement,  instead of lack of skill. William Shakespeare, believed that everyone was capable of greatness, it’s just up to the individual to want to be great. 

“Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds.” Albert Einstein 

Think back when that guy cut you off, what was your immediate reaction? Was that reaction necessary? Probably not, since he could hear how stupid of a driver he is and the fact that his past drivers instructor should be incarcerated for allowing you to pass drivers ed. So why allow that moment to cold heartedly piss us off and distract us from our greatness. 

Last week I made the decision to start going to bible study on a weekly basis. As a child Wednesday’s after school that’s where I would be, why did things change. Then I realized it’s because I’m an adult, I have the right to choose wether or not I want to sit in church for a few hours after staring at a computer screen for most of my day. 

As an adult I can choose this for myself, without my mom yelling about how I need to go. For years I chose not to, actively seek a church in my neighborhood because, “I didn’t like none of the churches in Kalamazoo,” or because “I already had a church home in Detroit.” Even though I haven’t been there in forever since I’ve moved away. 

However, I also wasn’t tapping into my greatness by feeding my spirit with what I believe in. Allowing my day to day routine be more important than my potential to be a greater self. 

I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.  Philippians 4:13

Being great takes practice, if the pros can do it so can you. 

Peace. 

Afro-Textured Hair IS Good Hair

“I wish I had good hair,” is what I used to say before I fully fell in love with everything about myself, hair included.

Growing up, many Black girls like me are conditioned to believe that our hair is not good unless it’s 1) long and 2) straight. Perms/relaxers were the cure to “nappy” hair. If your hair was anything outside of the norm, it was considered unkept. Being natural wasn’t even a thing like it is today, so rocking an afro definitely wasn’t encouraged.

Now that I think about it, I am completely disgusted with myself for believing in these ideologies, which led me saying things like, “I wish I was mixed so I could have good hair” and “I’m going to marry a white man so my kids can have good hair.”

What if society fetishized afro-textured hair as much as it fetishizes mixed-raced hair? I mean, everybody always loves Becky with the good hair. Unfortunately, I can’t say the same for my sistas with the afros.

Mainstream media contributes to this lack of love for afro-textured hair. It’s underrepresented and isn’t considered as beautiful as softer, curlier textures. Even people I know personally have this false ideology of what good hair is supposed to look like.

It’s time that we change the idea of what it means to have “good hair.” Black women have good hair. I have good hair. Afro-textured hair IS good hair. I had to stop and question…I don’t have good hair? According to what? The media? Pop culture? Men that drool over these Instagram honeys who are biracial with long, curly hair?

Caring for your hair, loving your hair, and keeping your hair healthy is what should constitute as having good hair. As Maya Payne Smart said in her article, “This Is How You Learn to Love Your Hair, your hair should “reflect great self-awareness, self-confidence and vision. Always remember who gave you that head of hair–your parents, your ancestors, your Creator. Then care for it like the inheritance it is.”

It’s time that we forget everything we were told about Black hair, and restructure our thinking to be more inclusive to all hair types, and realizing that mix-raced hair isn’t the only type of good hair. And for that reason, I rock my afro with dignity, confidence, pride, and love.